Intentional Acts

Although a majority of personal injury cases are caused by accident, intentional acts are a common cause of personal injuries as well. Legally, an intentional act is a deliberate action performed by another party or individual which may cause harm to another individual or their property.

With an intentional act the party responsible for the act is aware of what the result of their actions will be. When a person wants to make a claim against an individual or party for an intentional act they must be able to prove that the responsible person acted with the goal to perform the act and the injuries were a cause of it.

According to data from the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), in 1994 over 1.4 million persons were treated for intentional or perceived intentional acts of violence and it is likely that number has grown since then. Additionally the Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that in 2005 more than 346,000 establishments experienced some type of workplace violence incidence.

An intentional act may be brought upon a person or their property and may result in many different types of losses. If you or a loved one has suffered from an intentional act, the victim may be entitled to compensation for property damage, pain and suffering, medical bills, and more.

For a free, no-obligation evaluation of your incident, fill out the ‘FREE CASE REVIEW’ form to your left – it’s 100% FREE and completely confidential to submit.

Types of Intentional Acts

It is important to remember that for an intentional act a person must be able to prove that the person responsible for their damages acted with intent.

Some common types of intentional acts include:

  • Domestic Violence
  • Assault
  • Battery
  • False Imprisonment
  • Fraud
  • Infliction of Emotional Distress
  • Trespassing on land or private property
  • Property Damage
  • Reckless Use of a Vehicle or Machinery

Although reckless driving often falls under its own category it could be perceived as an intentional act if a person decided to use their vehicle as a weapon.

Damages Caused by Intentional Acts

Depending on the location and type of intentional act that happened, a person could suffer from many types of serious personal injuries. According to the BJS study most persons who went to the emergency room were treated for bruises caused by the intentional acts of violence.

Some other types of damages and injuries a person could incur include:

  • Property Damage
  • Psychological Injuries
  • Cuts
  • Orthopedic Damages
  • Head Trauma

These types of acts may be the result of violence, however there are times when they are not and damages could include damage to property, monetary losses on account of fraud, emotional distress caused by false imprisonment, and so on.

Contact our Greensboro Intentional Acts Attorney Today

If you or a loved one has been harmed at the hands of an individual or organization that maliciously intended to cause harm and you are seeking legal counsel on the matter, our experienced team of attorneys are ready to help.

At Mike Lewis Attorneys we sympathize with how scary and frustrating it can be to deal with an intentional act that caused you or your loved one harm. Oftentimes victims are not aware that they have rights and can seek damages against those who acted on intention. With more than 140 years of combined legal experience, our team has been assisting personal injury victims throughout the state of North Carolina for many years.

We have offices located in Winston-Salem and Greensboro, North Carolina and are proud to serve the following areas:

  • Cityview
  • North Winston
  • Columbia Heights
  • West Highlands
  • Ardmore
  • And more

To find out how we can help you fight for the MAXIMUM amount of compensation you deserve, contact us at 1-866-299-1769. Our intake staff members will connect you with one of our lawyers best suited in handling your claim after a few initial questions about your incident.

If you prefer to contact us online, simply fill out the ‘FREE CASE REVIEW’ form located at the top left hand corner of this page.